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Advanced Financial Accounting Syllabus - Carey … - payday advance stores near me



Advanced Financial Accounting2 CreditsBU.210.650.XX[Day & Time / ex: Monday, 6pm-9pm][Start & End Dates / ex: 8/20/18–10/15/18][Semester / ex: Fall 2018][Location / ex: Washington, DC]Instructor[Full Name]Contact Information[Email Address][Phone Number, ###- ###-#### (Optional)]Office Hours[Specify the day and time of the 2 hours that will be dedicated to office hours each week. For evening classes, faculty may wish to hold their office hours by phone or email. While faculty are permitted to state “and by appointment,” office hours should not be held exclusively by appointment.]Required Texts & Learning MaterialsTextbook: Wahlen, J., Baginski, S., & Bradshaw, M. (2015). Financial reporting, financial statement analysis, and valuation: A strategic perspective (8th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.Case Studies (you may purchase the four cases online; the link to the Coursepack is available on Blackboard):Radcliffe, V., & Cruz, P. (2012). BNL stores. W12213-PDF-ENG. London, Ontario, Canada: Ivey Publishing.Srinivasan, S., & Rossano, P. (2012). Ahold versus Tesco—Analyzing performance. 113040-PDF-ENG. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Publishing. McNichols, M., & Tayan, B. (2007). Earnings conference calls: Hewlett-Packard company. A193-PDF-ENG. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford Graduate School of Business. Serafeim, G., Healy, P., & Sesia, A. (2011). Oddo Securities—ESG integration. 111085-PDF-ENG. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Publishing.Course DescriptionAdvanced Financial Accounting is designed to prepare you to analyze, interpret, and use financial statements effectively, both from a general manager and from an investor perspective. The course will review and extend the topics introduced in Accounting and Financial Reporting, with an emphasis on value creation. Specifically, the course will introduce a thorough framework for financial statement analysis, focusing on (1) accounting analysis, (2) financial (ratio and cash flow) analysis, and (3) prospective (forecasting and valuation) analysis.Prerequisite(s)BU.210.620 OR BU.910.611Learning ObjectivesBy the end of this course, students will be able to: Review and understand the six sequential steps in financial statement analysis.Effectively analyze, interpret, and use financial statements.Use financial analysis tools, methods, and techniques to analyze a company's profitability.Use financial analysis tools, methods, and techniques to analyze a company's risk, including unexpected changes in commodity prices, exchange rates, and interest rates.Evaluate the quality of income statement and balance sheet information.Prepare forecasted financial statements.Review and understand three valuation models.To view the complete list of the Carey Business School’s general learning goals and objectives, visit the Carey website.Attendance Attendance on-time is proper business etiquette and a minimal requirement for classroom participation. Being regularly late or leaving early or both is unprofessional. Because participation is a part of the grading system of this course, poor attendance is not to your advantage. There will be attendance sheet to be signed in every class. Emergencies with proper documentation will be exempted. Please note that business trips do not count as emergency. Attendance accounts for 5% of the final grade. For example: students miss one class will lose 1/8th of the 5%, which is 0.625 point out of 100 points.Assignments AssignmentLearning ObjectivesWeightAttendance and participation in class discussion1–75%Homework assignments1–715%Quizzes1–725%Forecasting project615%Final Exam1–740%Total100%Homework: There will be individual homework assignments to be collected and graded. Late submission will not be accepted. The textbook covers basic financial statement analysis concepts, methods, and accounting principles. The weekly assigned problems will emphasize the comprehension of these principles and concepts, problem solving, and their application to real business situations. Completing the individual problems assigned for each chapter is imperative for successful completion of the course.Project: Projecting Financial Statements: details will be given by the instructor. Quiz: Throughout the semester, there will be two quizzes given.Final-term Exam: In-class exam. It will be given on the 8th week of the course and covers all topics taught in the class. The final exam will be three hours in length. No makeup examinations will be given. However, in case of an emergency (illness, etc., supported by proper documentation), incomplete will be assigned and I will set up an exam for you before the incomplete expires.GradingThe grade of A is reserved for those who demonstrate extraordinarily excellent performance as determined by the instructor. The grade of A- is awarded only for excellent performance. The grades of B+, B, and B- are awarded for good performance. The grades of C+, C, and C- are awarded for adequate but substandard performance.?The grades of D+, D, and D- are not awarded at the graduate level (undergraduate only). The grade of F indicates the student’s failure to satisfactorily complete the course work.Please note that for Core and Foundation courses, a maximum of 25% of students may be awarded an A or A-; the grade point average of the class should not exceed 3.3. For Elective courses, a maximum of 35% of students may be awarded an A or A-; the grade point average of the class should not exceed 3.4. (For classes with 15 students or fewer, the class GPA cap is waived.)Tentative Course CalendarThe instructors reserve the right to alter course content and/or adjust the pace to accommodate class progress. Students are responsible for keeping up with all adjustments to the course calendar.WeekTopicReadingDue1Financial Reporting, Financial Statement Analysis, and ValuationAsset and Liability Valuation and Income RecognitionChapters 1, 22Understand the relationship among Net Income, Balance Sheet, and Cash FlowsProfitability AnalysisChapters 3, 4Homework for Week 13Quiz 1Risk AnalysisAccounting QualityChapters 5, 6Homework for Week 24Overview of Financing, Investing, and Operating ActivitiesChapters 7, 8, 9Homework for Week 35Forecasting Financial Statements Part 1 Chapter 10Homework for Week 46Quiz 2Forecasting Financial Statements Part 2Chapter 10Homework for Week 57Overview of Valuation MethodsChapters 12, 13, 14Final Project due8Final ExamCarey Business School Policies and General InformationBlackboard SiteA Blackboard course site is set up for this course. Each student is expected to check the site throughout the semester as Blackboard will be the primary venue for outside classroom communications between the instructors and the students. Students can access the course site at https://blackboard.jhu.edu. Support for Blackboard is available at 1-866-669-6138.Disability Support ServicesAll students with disabilities who require accommodations for this course should contact Disability Support Services at their earliest convenience to discuss their specific needs. If you have a documented disability, you must be registered with Disability Support Services (carey.disability@jhu.edu or 410-234-9243) to receive accommodations. For more information, please visit the Disability Support Services webpage.Academic Ethics PolicyCarey expects graduates to be innovative business leaders and exemplary global citizens. The Carey community believes that honesty, integrity, and community responsibility are qualities inherent in an exemplary citizen. The objective of the Academic Ethics Policy (AEP) is to create an environment of trust and respect among all members of the Carey academic community and hold Carey students accountable to the highest standards of academic integrity and excellence.It is the responsibility of every Carey student, faculty member, and staff member to familiarize themselves with the AEP and its procedures. Failure to become acquainted with this information will not excuse any student, faculty, or staff from the responsibility to abide by the AEP. Please contact the Student Services office if you have any questions. For the full policy, please visit the Academic Ethics Policy webpage.Student Conduct CodeThe fundamental purpose of the Johns Hopkins University’s regulation of student conduct is to promote and to protect the health, safety, welfare, property, and rights of all members of the University community as well as to promote the orderly operation of the University and to safeguard its property and facilities. As members of the University community, students accept certain responsibilities which support the educational mission and create an environment in which all students are afforded the same opportunity to succeed academically. Please contact the Student Services office if you have any questions. For the full policy, please visit the Student Conduct Code webpage.Student Success CenterThe Student Success Center offers free online and in-person one-on-one and group coaching in writing, presenting, and quantitative courses. For more information on these services and others, or to book an appointment, please visit the Student Success Center website.Other Important Policies and ServicesStudents are encouraged to consult the Student Handbook and Academic Catalog and Student Services and Resources for information regarding other policies and services.Copyright StatementUnless explicitly allowed by the instructor, course materials, class discussions, and examinations are created for and expected to be used by class participants only.?The recording and rebroadcasting of such material, by any means, is forbidden. Violations are subject to sanctions under the Academic Ethics Policy.